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Posts for tag: Skin Cancer

By Dawson Dermatology
August 16, 2019
Category: Dermatology

Sun DamageToo much exposure to sunlight can be harmful to your skin. Dangerous ultraviolet B (UVB) and ultraviolet A (UVA) rays damage skin, which leads to premature wrinkles, skin cancer and other skin problems. People with excessive exposure to UV radiation are at greater risk for skin cancer than those who take careful precautions to protect their skin from the sun.

Sun Exposure Linked to Cancer

Sun exposure is the most preventable risk factor for all skin cancers, including melanoma. To limit your exposure to UV rays, follow these easy steps.

  • Avoid the mid-day sun, as the sun's rays are most intense during 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Remember that clouds do not block UV rays.
  • Use extra caution near water, snow and sand.
  • Avoid tanning beds and sun lamps which emit UVA and UVB rays.
  • Wear hats and protective clothing when possible to minimize your body's exposure to the sun.
  • Generously apply a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 30 to your exposed skin. Re-apply every two hours and after swimming or sweating.
  • Wear sunglasses to protect your eyes and area around your eyes.

Risks Factors

Everyone's skin can be affected by UV rays. People with fair skin run a higher risk of sunburns. Aside from skin tone, factors that may increase your risk for sun damage and skin cancer include:

  • Previously treated for cancer
  • Family history of skin cancer
  • Several moles
  • Freckles
  • Typically burn before tanning
  • Blond, red or light brown hair

If you detect unusual moles, spots or changes in your skin, or if your skin easily bleeds, make an appointment with our practice. Changes in your skin may be a sign of skin cancer. With early detection from your dermatologist, skin cancers have a high cure rate and response to treatment. Additionally, if you want to reduce signs of aged skin, seek the advice of your dermatologist for a variety of skin-rejuvenating treatment options.

By Dawson Dermatology
January 15, 2018
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Skin Cancer   Acne   Eczema   Psoriasis   Dermatologist  

Skin CareWhen school is in session, it’s easy for students to pick up a number of bad habits between late nights of studying and long sports practices. From poor eating habits to a lack of sleep and increased stress, unhealthy lifestyles can lead to unhealthy skin.

Whether you’re in middle school, high school or college, students everywhere can benefit from healthier skin. With a little extra care and attention, you can keep your skin blemish free all year long.

Keep your skin clean

This may sound obvious, but keeping your face clean is one of the most important things you can do to improve its health. Get in the habit of washing your face twice a day with warm water and a mild soap to remove the dirt and debris that accumulate throughout the school day.  

Hands off!

Avoid touching your face with your hands throughout the day as your hands contain oils that cause breakouts. Never pop pimples as this can irritate the skin, make acne worse and increase your risk for scarring.      

Moisturize

Moisturizers seal moisture into the skin to prevent skin from drying out. Your dermatologist can help you determine the best moisturizer for your skin type.

Avoid excessive sun exposure

Protect your skin from the sun by wearing sunscreen and avoiding overexposure. Too much sun can damage the skin leading to future breakouts and even skin cancer.

Improve your physical well-being

Your skin reflects what you eat, so remember to eat a balanced diet rich in vitamins and antioxidants. Learn to manage stress as it can make your skin more sensitive and trigger acne breakouts and other skin problems. Get plenty of rest every night; approximately 7-8 hours of restful sleep is essential for healthy skin.

By maintaining a consistent daily regimen that includes washing and a healthy diet, you can achieve clear, healthy skin throughout the entire school year. Whenever you have a question or concern about your skin, talk to your dermatologist. Dermatologists offer a range of treatments that help prevent and treat acne and other skin conditions. We can help you find the treatment method that's best for you.

By Dawson Dermatology
January 02, 2018
Category: Skin Care

Tanning BedWe all want to achieve a healthy tan. It makes us look and feel better, but that bronzed glow may not be as healthy as you think. A tan is your skin’s reaction to ultraviolet (UV) light. This darkening of the skin cells is the skin's natural defense against further damage from UV radiation.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), nearly 28 million people tan in the United States annually. Of these, 2.3 million are teens. Many people believe the UV rays of tanning beds are harmless, but this is far from true. Tanning beds emit UVA and usually UVB rays as well. Both UVA and UVB rays can cause long-term skin damage and premature aging (i.e. wrinkles, spots and sagging skin), and can contribute to skin cancer.

The AAD states that the risk of melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer—is 75% higher among people who used tanning beds in their teens and 20s. Despite the known risks associated with indoor tanning these numbers continue to increase, as do the incidences of cancer.

Visit your dermatologist immediately if you detect any unusual changes in your skin’s appearance, such as:

  • A change or an increase in the size or thickness of a mole or spot
  • Change in color or texture of the mole
  • Irregularity in the border of a mole

Protecting yourself from UV exposure is the best defense against premature aging and skin cancer. In addition to avoiding indoor tanning beds, you should also always wear sunscreen outdoors to protect your skin from the sun’s damaging rays. Remember to self-examine your own skin as well as have your skin checked regularly by your dermatologist. 

Whether you acquire your tan from the beach or a lamp, it’s not safe and it’s not healthy. If you’re a regular tanner, it may be time to rethink your current stance on the standards of beauty. There are safe alternatives to a bronzed glow without risking your health.

By Dawson Dermatology
September 19, 2017
Category: Skin Care
Tags: Skin Cancer   Skin Exams  

Skin cancer is a concern for patients who are overexposed to the sun’s rays and who have a family history of this condition. Learn why skin examsregular skin exams are extremely important if you are at risk of skin cancer. You can have your skin checked by our Honolulu, HI, dermatologists - Dr. Kevin Dawson, Dr. Douglas Chun and Dr. Sarah Grekin at Dawson Dermatology.

Skin Cancer Risks
If you are a patient who is at a higher risk of developing skin cancer, regular skin exams are very important. These are some of the factors that may increase the risk of skin cancer:

- Pale or light skin.
- Spending several hours per day in the sun (whether for leisure or work).
- A family history of skin disease.
- A previous diagnosis.

What Happens At a Skin Exam?
At an in-office skin exam, your Honolulu dermatologist will take a close look at all areas of the body that are most often exposed the sun, including the arms, face, back, and legs. There are five indicators that doctors look at (ABCDE) when diagnosing skin cancer:

- Asymmetry of the spot or mole.
- Border irregularity.
- Color varies (i.e. different shades of brown and black).
- Diameter (a mole shouldn’t be larger than a pencil eraser).
- Evolving (the spot is changing).

If you notice any abnormalities, point them out to your dermatologist immediately at the skin exam. Also, if a lesion suddenly starts to bleed or become infected, that is an urgent concern to bring to your doctor.

Importance of These Exams
Because this type of cancer is easy to detect with the naked eye, it is often successfully caught and treated in its early stages. Early detection with regular skin exams saves lives and minimizes the need for invasive treatments.

Schedule an Appointment to Check Your Skin
Get your skin checked by a dermatologist at Dawson Dermatology in Honolulu, HI. Call 808-599-3780 today to schedule an examination.

By Dawson Dermatology
July 05, 2017
Category: Skin Conditions
Tags: Skin Cancer   Moles  

Although moles are usually harmless, in some cases they can become cancerous, causing melanoma. For this reason, it is important to molesregularly examine your skin for any moles that change in size, color, shape, sensation or that bleed.  Suspicious or abnormal moles or lesions should always be examined by your dermatologist.

What to Look For

Remember the ABCDE's of melanoma when examining your moles. If your mole fits any of these criteria, you should visit your dermatologist as soon as possible.  

  • Asymmetry. One half of the mole does not match the other half.
  • Border. The border or edges of the mole are poorly defined or irregular.
  • Color. The color of the mole is not the same throughout or has shades of tan, brown, black, blue, white or red.
  • Diameter. The diameter of a mole is larger than the eraser of a pencil.
  • Evolution. The mole is changing in size, shape or color.

Moles can appear anywhere on the skin, including the scalp, between the fingers and toes, on the soles of the feet and even under the nails. The best way to detect skin cancer in its earliest, most curable stage is by checking your skin regularly and visiting our office for a full-body skin cancer screening. Use this guide to perform a self-exam.

  • Use a mirror to examine your entire body, starting at your head and working your way to the toes. Also be sure to check difficult to see areas, including between your fingers and toes, the groin, the soles of your feet and the backs of your knees.
  • Pay special attention to the areas exposed to the most sun.
  • Don't forget to check your scalp and neck for moles. Use a handheld mirror or ask a family member to help you.
  • Develop a mental note or keep a record of all the moles on your body and what they look like. If they do change in any way (color, shape, size, border, etc.), or if any new moles look suspicious, visit your dermatologist right away.  

Skin cancer has a high cure rate if detected and treated early. The most common warning sign is a visible change on the skin, a new growth, or a change in an existing mole. Depending on the size and location of the mole, dermatologists may use different methods of mole removal. A body check performed by a dermatologist can help determine whether the moles appearing on the body are pre-cancerous or harmless.